The Hardest Part of Our Work

June 3, 2019 at Business, content strategy, products, UX

Tori Street tweeted a few days back where she asked the content practitioners for what is the hardest part of our work.

A majority of responses circled around getting a buy-in, shared understanding among all stakeholders, convincing others on content-before-design, and educating others on all sorts of value driven product design efforts.

This is what I have been doing so often in the past, but is it the hardest part?

I asked myself and I found something else even more harder. Here is what I replied in the tweet.

For me, this is the hardest part of my job is when I need to continuously tell people around me, my team, the stakeholders, sometimes to their network too, on where we can do better, and why we should do it?

This is because after first few days or weeks, I get a feeling that as if I make them feel stupid.

Most often, it is about right customer onboarding strategy, customer’s experience with the product, their stickiness with the product for its utility, customers’ success points for their goals, the traction, and why customers should continue using the product.

To give them any benefit of doubt, ever, is the hardest part.

For example, let us talk about a SaaS pricing page which is such an important strategic point for the business for conversions, retention, and growth.

Designing this SaaS pricing page is and to get it right can be really complex and challenging because it calls for a variety of skills – data driven pricing points, communicating the layered prices in each plan and to map the value metrics for each plan, identifying how the customers may evaluate a plan against others, the CTA message in right vocabulary, and to inspire the trust to try, or buy or to upgrade.

If the design team cannot get the right balance in page structure or in the message, or if the pricing strategist fails to inspire the confidence that each plan’s features map with the corresponding price, the hardest part is NOT to make them feel stupid that they are not doing their job properly.